The argument of contingency theories

Here, the well-rehersed absurdities resultant from infinite sequences come into play. On this view, there is nothing in virtue of which God made the world. Thus, the universe is but a part of a multiverse. Thus, there could be no causal explanation for the number 9, as it exists over and above the causal chains that contingent things exist within the world.

The cost of this view is that it seems intuitively very obvious that most things are only contingently existing. A1 Everything that exists has an explanation of its existence either in the necessity of its own nature or in an external cause.

You and I, too, might not have existed; our respective parents might never have met, or might have decided not to have children, or might have decided to have children at a different time.

There are contingently existing things in the world like pillowsso there must have been a necessarily existing thing that caused them to come into being. So no such pool of ectoplasm will suffice as the ultimate explanation of things, and neither would a flying pasta monster or Thor.

The laws of mathematics are often thought to be necessary. Our existence, therefore, is contingent. A1 Everything that exists has an explanation of its existence either in the necessity of its own nature or in an external cause. The argument There are various ways to phrase the argument, and there will doubtless be ways to spell it out that avoid my particular objection, but this is a classic way of presenting the argument.

It should be noted, however, that science does not currently provide us with good answers to the above questions. Obviously, in this case unlike in option 2 there is no contingently existing thing that has no explanation for its existence; each contingently existing thing has a contingently existing thing as the explanation for its existence.

The argument from contingency

Lastly, one could try to opt for option 1, where each domino falls because of the previous one, in a never ending sequence back into infinity. Philosophically, we would know this being to be God. On this world, the existence of the universe is indeed contingent, but also without explanation, which violates the principle of sufficient reason after all.

Its existence is contingent, in that it could have not existed. Our existence, therefore, is contingent. There is some causal story we could tell which would explain why this pillow exists.

Philosophy of Religion

Similar reasoning applies to option 1. On this view, there is nothing which explains why he made this world rather than another, or rather than none at all.

Argument from Contingency

Lastly, one could try to opt for option 1, where each domino falls because of the previous one, in a never ending sequence back into infinity.

For every difference in our world there must correspond a difference in the lower, underlying reality if there is one. It seems that these are the only possible options, and so all one has to do to prove that God exists is to rule out the first two options.

They might not have existed, and so there must be some reason that they do so.

The argument from contingency

It is difficult even to think of what can possibly be the explanation for all of existence, for nothing could exist to provide such an explanation. Physics can be seen as describing the nature of things.

So, there must be something that explains the universe.

The Argument of Contingency for the Existence of God

The options seem to be: After all, it must have taken him an infinite amount of time for him to get here, whether he got here yesterday, today or tomorrow. But even this wild speculation doesn't answer the question of why that is so, why all possibilities exist and why there are only specific possibilities that can exist our world - yes; a world where the symmetries of nature are different - no, not according to modern quantum cosmology.

The problem with this is supposed to be that the idea that contingently existing things require explanations is a fundamental assumption to science, and to any rational understanding of the world. In conclusion, the idea that every thing that exists has an explanation for its existence is completely unfounded.

In other words, the goal is to prove something beyond reasonable doubt. And if the universe itself is not necessary, then it does not explain itself. Nothing about the universe—nothing about the laws of physics or any of the stuff in the universe, like bugs or antelope or matter in general—explains why the universe continues to persist at any moment in time, either at all, or in the way that it does.

In essence, the argument attempts to address the question "Why are things the way they are?. The Argument from Contingency. The modal cosmological argument or “argument from contingency” is the argument from the contingency of the world or universe to the existence of God.

The argument from contingency is the most prominent form of cosmological argument historically.

Philosophy of Religion

The Argument of Contingency for the Existence of God On today’s podcast, Tom asked what I think the most important question is that a person can ask. I told him I thought the most important question a person can ask, is the question that Leibniz said was the most important question a person can ask: [ ].

The Argument from Contingency Copleston sets out his argument for the existence of God - an argument from contingency that is a type of Cosmological Argument. This is probably the most important passage in the extract for students to understand.

Nov 21,  · The argument from contingency. 0. The ‘argument from contingency’ is a version of the cosmological argument. It has various forms, and historians of philosophy trace it as far back as Avicenna in the 10th century.

It is one of Aquinas’ five proofs, and is part of the repertoire of the classical apologetical method. On Contingency [A1] The heart of the argument is the denial of true contingency. Everything must have an explanation - that some fact holds means that it holds because of its own nature (necessarily) or because it was brought about by some external cause (it is contingent on that cause).

Contingency approaches emphasize that in order for organizations to succeed they must adopt a structure suitable for the environment in which they operate.

Two types of theories are referred as contingency theories: theories of .

The argument of contingency theories
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